Warwick Fuller

Warwick Fuller

I’m ever the optimist, I can’t help it, I don’t try to be positive. It’s my nature. In my library there are two very worn and well read books that spring easily to mind when the subject of optimism comes up. One is Henry Lawson’s ‘When the World was Wide’ and the other, Victor Daley’s ‘Wine and Roses’. When first reading them in my teens, their very titles swelled in me a great sense of optimism. Mind you, it doesn’t do well to ponder those titles too long or the shine goes off them, particularly when you delve between the covers of those wonderful volumes. They along with many other examples illustrate to me my buoyant outlook back then.

The black dog has never hounded me, even in the few dark or sad phases of my life. Is it my intimate connection with the landscape that has helped steel me and shown me resilience? Or is it my inherent optimism that has formed and developed that connection? Either way, I know it’s a real and valuable influence on the way I paint.

Art through the ages has been borne of many influences. Anger, Joy, grief, hate, devotion, love and all the human senses. Through a painter’s career, I presume most get a run at various stages. Optimism may not be an emotion, but for me it sits in well with those influencers.

Earlier this year, I was invited by ABC TV’s Landline, to paint the aftermath of the bushfires for an upcoming segment. I wasn’t comfortable with the initial concept, as I have little interest in exploring the damage, ugliness and misery caused by our recent bushfires. After a little teasing out, we turned the proposed theme around to one of renewal and regeneration. I was then excited to interpret that aspect of the landscape.

Optimism isn’t part of the arsenal that I gather around me when I paint, such as for example, the right materials ready go. It’s simply there helping to keep a positive vibe active, which can make all the difference to what I generally strive for in a painting.

Warwick Fuller 2020